eddieblackisback:

Clip 1. Clip 2. Clip 3. Clip 4. Clip 5. Clip 6. Clip 7.
Provided here are links to the full documentary split into 7 parts. 

For three decades, the film canisters sat undisturbed in a cellar beneath the Swedish National Broadcasting Company. Inside was roll after roll of startlingly fresh and candid 16mm footage shot in the 1960s and 1970s in the United States, all of it focused on the anti-war and Black Power movements. When filmmaker Goran Hugo Olsson discovered the footage, he decided he had a responsibility to shepherd this glimpse of history into the world.
With contemporary audio interviews from leading African American artists, activists, musicians and scholars, The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 looks at the people, society, culture, and style that fuelled an era of convulsive change. Utilizing an innovative format that riffs on the popular 1970s mixtape format, Mixtape is a cinematic and musical journey into the black communities of America.
At the end of the ’60s and into the early ’70s, Swedish interest in the U.S. civil rights movement and the U.S. anti-war movement peaked. With a combination of commitment and naiveté, Swedish filmmakers traveled across the Atlantic to explore the Black Power movement, which was being alternately ignored or portrayed in the U.S. media as a violent, nascent terrorist movement.
Despite the obstacles they encountered, both from the conservative white American power establishment and from radicalized movement members themselves, the Swedish filmmakers stayed committed to their investigation, and ultimately formed bonds with key figures in the movement.
This newly discovered footage offers a penetrating examination — through the lens of Swedish filmmakers — of the Black Power movement from 1967 to 1975, and its worldwide resonance. The result is like an anthropological treatise on an exotic civilization from the point of view of outsiders who approached their subject with no assumptions or biases.

eddieblackisback:

Clip 1. Clip 2. Clip 3. Clip 4. Clip 5. Clip 6. Clip 7.

Provided here are links to the full documentary split into 7 parts. 

For three decades, the film canisters sat undisturbed in a cellar beneath the Swedish National Broadcasting Company. Inside was roll after roll of startlingly fresh and candid 16mm footage shot in the 1960s and 1970s in the United States, all of it focused on the anti-war and Black Power movements. When filmmaker Goran Hugo Olsson discovered the footage, he decided he had a responsibility to shepherd this glimpse of history into the world.

With contemporary audio interviews from leading African American artists, activists, musicians and scholars, The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 looks at the people, society, culture, and style that fuelled an era of convulsive change. Utilizing an innovative format that riffs on the popular 1970s mixtape format, Mixtape is a cinematic and musical journey into the black communities of America.

At the end of the ’60s and into the early ’70s, Swedish interest in the U.S. civil rights movement and the U.S. anti-war movement peaked. With a combination of commitment and naiveté, Swedish filmmakers traveled across the Atlantic to explore the Black Power movement, which was being alternately ignored or portrayed in the U.S. media as a violent, nascent terrorist movement.

Despite the obstacles they encountered, both from the conservative white American power establishment and from radicalized movement members themselves, the Swedish filmmakers stayed committed to their investigation, and ultimately formed bonds with key figures in the movement.

This newly discovered footage offers a penetrating examination — through the lens of Swedish filmmakers — of the Black Power movement from 1967 to 1975, and its worldwide resonance. The result is like an anthropological treatise on an exotic civilization from the point of view of outsiders who approached their subject with no assumptions or biases.

1,075 notes

newwavecrashing:

Amy Poehler in a Le Tigre shirt. the world is complete.

newwavecrashing:

Amy Poehler in a Le Tigre shirt. the world is complete.

115 notes

For most Jews, we are no longer a true diaspora, having built homes and lives anchoring us to once-unfamiliar lands generations ago. It is possible to challenge and even reject a concept which defines Jewishness by proximity—politically and physically—to Israel. Let us liberate ourselves from the obligation to support unconscionable acts by a government which we did not elect, from telling ourselves that our security and our identity are threatened by a people whom so many of us have never even met. Let us instead offer our voices in solidarity with the small but persistent political Left, who are being beaten on the streets of Tel-Aviv for their anti-war stance. And then, let us act on the basis that many of us are citizens of countries whose governments support or tolerate, both financially and ideologically, the systematic dehumanization of the Palestinian people.

150 notes

feuille-d-automne:

Late nineteenth century interior
Via LovedayLemon on Flickr

feuille-d-automne:

Late nineteenth century interior

Via LovedayLemon on Flickr

337 notes

kropotkitten:

In one of the Felix films he literally organizes stray cats to wage class warfare on humans who keep kicking them around. 

kropotkitten:

In one of the Felix films he literally organizes stray cats to wage class warfare on humans who keep kicking them around. 

(Source: art-and-anarchism)

1,861 notes

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Knights of Columbus Building, New Haven, Connecticut, 1967-69
(Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo Associates)

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Knights of Columbus Building, New Haven, Connecticut, 1967-69

(Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo Associates)

603 notes